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EFHW-16040-HP

$189.99

Out of stock

4.8 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings
(5 customer reviews)

Product Description

EFHW-16040-HP Four band End Fed Half Wave Antenna – 259 Feet (~79m) long

  • NO TUNER needed!
  • Perfect for  DX-ing, EMCOM …
  • Resonant on 160/80/60 and 40m
  • 1.5kW-max.

EFHW-16040-HP Multiband band  End Fed Half Wave Antenna

This is an End-Fed Half-Wave (EFHW*) antenna for 160/80/60/40m. Unlike many END FED antennas on the market, this one does not require the Antenna Tuner to operate. It is a resonant Half wave on 160m (1.8MHz) therefore also resonant on the second harmonic of 3.6MHz, the third harmonic of 5.4MHz and fourth harmonic of 7.2MHz. 

*This is perfect antenna for DX-ers 

Various installations such as horizontal, vertical, as inverted V, as inverted L, zigzag etc. are possible.

  • NO TUNER needed!
  • NO counterpoise needed! (Grounding recommended)
  • Frequency coverage: 1.8/3.6/5.4/7.2MHz
  • Resonant on 160/80/60/40m
  • Wire length ~259 feet
  • Power Handling: 1.5kW I.C.A.S
  • Stainless Steel hardware
  • Stealth Marine #14 AWG Tinned black wire
  • Connector: Silver/Teflon SO-239

 

SKU: EFHW-16040-HP Category: Tags: ,

5 reviews for EFHW-16040-HP

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    Great antenna for me. Hears almost as well as my old Double Bazooka but it is much lighter and much less maintenance. I would certainly recommend to anyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    :

    I have the 16040 and the 10-40 endfeds up and running. For the last several days I was unable to hear VP6AH using 100 watts and a Windom on Pitcairn Island with my 10-40 endfed antenna. Today I switched over to the 16040 antenna and could hear the station on 17 meters. I was able to make the contact. The 160-40 meter antenna worked on 17 meters today when I really needed the help. The 10-40 antenna has given me 73 countries in the last 6 months or so. The myantennas.com endfeds are great antennas.

  3. 5 out of 5

    :

    Antenna works great good improvement over my window 80 to 10 meter dipole a lot better receive and transmit less noise also and is only mounted 25 feet high in the fat top configuration will buy from again

  4. 4 out of 5

    :

    After owning the EFHW-8010-HP for several months, and being very happy with its performance (see my review), I decided to add an additional EFHW perpendicularly oriented for 160 through 40 meters. My results have been a bit mixed, but performance on the lower two bands 160m and 80m has been good.

    The antenna feed is mounted at a 4 foot height along the side of my home (brick construction), and runs vertically for 25 feet before taking a long horizontal run to a large tree approximately 200 feet away. I was able to get the end of the antenna strung over the top of the tree at an elevation of roughly 50 feet.

    With the wire provided by myantennas.com, the initial install showed that the antenna was too long for 160/80 — resonances at 1.688 MHz, 3.456 MHz, 5.560 MHz and 7.488 MHz. (Note that the 60 meter and 40 meter bands did not fall near the resonances.) With a simple linear calculation of length versus resonance frequency at the lower end, I removed approximately 25 feet of wire and the antenna was now resonant within both the 160 and 80 meter bands — resonances at 1.838MHz, 3.752MHz, 5.824MHz and 7.888MHz. Now, however, the 60m and 40m bands were even further from resonance. VSWR over the 160 meter band ranged from 1.78 to 4.78:1; while over the 80 meter band VSWR varied from 1.58 to 4.66:1, easily managed with a tuner (2:1 bandwidths were 72 KHz at 160 meters and 152 KHz at 80 meters). Before making these measurements, I added a common mode choke at the antenna feed (this brought the resonance frequencies down a fraction of a percent).

    With the antenna now adjusted for 160 and 80 meters, VSWR over the 7.0-7.3MHz segment exceeded 8.7:1, making the antenna pretty much useless at 40 meters. 60 meters was actually a bit worse — VSWR >10:1.

    From what I have measured, the EFHW-16040-HP is really only useable on 160 and 80 meters. I was disappointed that I could not squeak 40 meters out of it, but it did give me the low band (160 meters) that I was missing. My guess is that the magnetic core material used in the matching network supplied may not be totally suitable for use at the higher frequencies.

  5. 5 out of 5

    :

    I wanted to add a correction to my previous review on this antenna, and thank Danny from myantennas.com for his help! I hope this review will help others getting this antenna to work well on 160/80/60 and 40 meters.

    As I noted in my Sept 16, 2017 review, the antenna tuned high on the 60 and 40 meter bands, while showing resonance within the 160 and 80 meter segments. Danny pointed out to me that, at a 50 foot elevation, the 160 meter antenna is operating well within 1/4 wavelength from the ground and gets pulled in frequency due to ground effects. (I’m a microwave guy, so “far field” for me is measured in inches! I did not stop and think of the effects on 160 meters.) So, when the antenna is trimmed for proper operation on 160 and 80 meters, it becomes too short on 60 and 40 meters.

    The solution was a simple one. By adding a small coil at a distance of approximately 25 feet from the feed point of the antenna, the two higher resonances now fall within the 60 and 40 meter bands. My initial NEC analysis of the antenna indicated that a value of 4.7uH at 23 feet would yield a resonance at 7.2 MHz. After a bit of trial and error, I ended up using a coil with 12.4 uH of inductance (20 turns on a 1.9″ OD PVC pipe) pushing the resonance down to 7.1 MHz.

    With the additional loading coil, resonances occurred at 1.864 MHz, 3.548 MHz, 5.372 MHz and 7.108 MHz. Perfect!

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